Six Thinking Hats

Six Thinking Hats

What is the Six Thinking Hats Technique by Edward De Bono?

The Six Thinking Hats is a role-playing model developed by Edward de Bono in 1986. Each hat represents a different lens or perspective on a particular issue and is an insightful activity that prevents narrow thinking. 

It serves as a team-based problem solving and brainstorming technique that can be used to explore problems through various perspectives in order to uncover options that might otherwise be overlooked. 

The basic premise behind the Six Thinking Hats is that most people think and reason in a specific way based on their personality type.  This means that a more emotional person may generate ideas differently than a more analytical person, and vice-versa. Similarly a pessimist will approach a situation very differently than an optimist.

An example of the benefit of running the thinking hats techniques is therefore to encourage different perspectives to be shared, seen and discussed as part of the decision making process.

The six types of “Thinking Hats” are:

  • White Hat: Similar to the calm and pure emotions associated with the colour white, this type of thinking focuses on analytical, objective thinking, with an emphasis on facts and feasibility.
  • Red Hat: We often associate the colour red with anger and heat and hence this represents emotional thinking, subjective feelings, perception, and opinion.
  • Black Hat: The colour black has been stereotypically linked with doom and gloom and so this forms a type of thinking that is critical, skeptical, focused on risks, and identifying problems.
  • Yellow Hat: Often symbolising sunshine and happiness, the yellow hat is about thinking optimistic, speculative, best-case scenarios.
  • Blue Hat: Blue being the colour of the sky and high above creates a sense of structured thinking, high-level overview of the situation, the big picture.
  • Green Hat: Associated with the colour of trees and nature, the green hat is about creative, associative thinking, new ideas, brainstorming, out-of-the-box.
Meeting tips using the 6 thinking hats technique

Use the Six Thinking Hats for Better Meetings

Six Thinking Hats is a powerful technique for decision making that includes different points of view.

The process and methodology allows emotion and skepticism to be brought into what might normally be a purely rational process, and it opens up the opportunity for creativity within decision making.

Decisions made using the Six Thinking Hats technique can be more resilient and based on a holistic perspective, allowing you to avoid pitfalls and gaps before you have committed to a decision.

When Should I use the Six Thinking Hats Technique?

Use the Six Thinking Hats model to help with:

  • Running better and more structured meetings especially if there tends to only be a single view at every meeting.
  • Making better decisions by having a more holistic and wide ranging view of the problem. 
  • Approaching problems from various angles of facts, emotions and creativity.
  • Inspiring idea generation as an ice-breaker activity by having different people play different roles.
  • More collaboration during brainstorming and decision making with assigned roles including facilitator responsibilities.

Six Thinking Hats Template Example

Imagine if you are facilitating a meeting to introduce a new product or service to the market. In doing so, you might ask people to wear different hats, or to navigate between the hats around this goal.

White Hat

“What are the facts that we know?”

 – Our survey last month indicated a 5% preference of the green product by women aged 25 – 45.

– Return rates from sales has fallen by over 50% since the introduction of the new delivery packaging.

– There are new delivery routes available via Company Logistics.

Yellow Hat

“Why should we be optimistic?”

 – The new product could increase our revenue diversification stream and increase our family of products.

– We can start receiving better feedback and testimonials from our customers.

– The impact from damage from delivery will meet our service standards.

Red Hat

“What are your gut reactions?”

– The green colour inspires a sustainable look and is very appealing. This is even a great shade.

– The impact on the reduced return rates could mean additional resources.

– How do the new delivery routes impact our delivery times? I would certainly be interested in learning more about it.

Green Hat

 “How can we create opportunities?”

– A green range could be expanded to a different colour range set or be symbolic.

– Creating multiple channels will allow us to establish new partnerships and partners.

– Speeding up quality and reliability of delivery could allow us to bundle exisiting products.

Black Hat

“What risks should we keep in mind?”

– Is a 5% preference sufficient for us to make a single colour product? What happens if preferences change.

– What is the cost of maintaining the packaging quality and sustainability?

– The new delivery routes may not have been proven as reliable yet or may increase our costs.

Blue Hat

“What systems or processes will be needed?”

 – Let’s go around the room and discuss the colour options based.

– How has the reduced return rates impacted our warehousing department?

– Would there be any other changes to our workflow with a new delivery partner and will it change our logistics technology?

How to Use the Six Thinking Hats to Run Better Meetings

Six Thinking Hats is a powerful technique for looking at decision-making from different points of view. By introducing a structured parallel thinking process, it helps people to be more focused and mindfully involved in a discussion.

Brainstorm

Start brainstorming through each of the different hats.

Group

Review the responses for common themes that can be grouped.

Vote

Have people voted on the topics that they would like to discuss the most.

Share

Share the results and facilitate the discussion towards a decision.

Cross Device Compatibility

Save effort, time and money with GroupMap

Whether you have your best minds together in the same room, or distributed around the world, GroupMap’s unique technology allows groups of up to 2000 to submit ideas independently at separate times, from different places, in different timezones. Prevent dominant personalities swaying the group, drowning out the opinions of others – GroupMap allows everyone to brainstorm independently then effortlessly combines that information to reveal the full spectrum of ideas. GroupMap templates keep the objective front and center throughout the session, keeping everyone on task. This ensures the activity identifies actionable issues rather than becoming just a discussion on ideas. GroupMap gives you all the group decision making tools you need to prioritize, decide and take action.

Create your first map and invite people in to start sharing their thoughts right NOW. Experience the power of GroupMap with our 14-day, no risk, FREE trial. You don’t even need to provide your credit card details to access to all of our features, including the entire suite of templates, for a full 14 days.

What, So What, What Now?

What So What What Now

What is a What, So What, What Now?

What? So What? Now What? is a reflective model that helps teams evaluate a shared experience or a recent event so that they can identify ways to improve or act. This critical thinking model was researched and  developed by Rolfe et al. in 2001. It is also attributed to Henri Lipmanowicz and Keith McCandless, the creators of Liberating Structures.

The What, So What, What Now exercise works on brainstorming and reflecting on:

  • Understanding the event (What?) 
  • Making sense of the facts and implications (So What?)
  • Identifying the course of action or new solutions (Now What?)

Why Do a What, So What, What Now?

This model can be used for a critical reflection session through a crisis management situation where you need to define and frame the problem, analyse the impact and then consider the possible actions to address the issue.

Related templates
Facilitation tips

Who Should Use this Technique?

This system is a reflective method that can be used by groups who would like to better understand problems and discover better solutions.

Examples include:

  • Crisis Management such as last minute cancellations due to a global pandemic or loss of venue booked.
  • Problem solving meetings where the delivery time has exceeded expectations.
  • Retrospective meetings to help teams work through continuous improvement issues.
  • Impact analysis meetings where a change of policy, an incident or event has repercussions on strategy, people or processes.
  • See last minute cancellations due to a global pandemic or loss of venue booked. 

Use the What, So What, What Now to help with:

  • resolving crisis and issues strategically; 
  • gaining new perspectives and understandings;
  • clarifying our assumptions and beliefs, and developing a clear rationale for our actions and approaches;
  • promoting a positive sense of self-awareness and self-confidence
  • taking informed action; and,
  • focusing on a philosophy of continuous growth and improvement.

What, So What, What Now Template

The What, So What, What Now template provides 3 separate columns and allows everyone in the team to collaboratively define the problem and share implications on the project or their work. The thumbs up and thumbs down feature lets you check for consensus along the way.Capture additional comments and move people from problem definition through to creating actions that address and overcome the issue.

How to Do a What, So What, What Now?

Tip To get the most from the What, So What, What Now technique, gather input from a range participants with different perspectives. When you’re working with a large or distributed team, getting everyone together at the same time can be difficult, inconvenient, and costly. Using different technologies like video conferencing, online forms, and collaborative brainstorming software such as GroupMap can help overcome these challenges.

Brainstorm

Gather the right people who have insights or are being impacted by the problem.

Like/Dislike

Vote on the best possible actions and the next steps, so that the items with the most votes can be decided as the right move to mitigate and/or address the issue at hand.

Results

Once the crisis has been mitigated, provide a report on how as a team you came together to decide on this course of action, that can be shared with team members and those on the executive levels.

Cross Device Compatibility

Save effort, time and money with GroupMap

Whether you have your best minds together in the same room, or distributed around the world, GroupMap’s unique technology allows groups of up to 2000 to submit ideas independently at separate times, from different places, in different timezones. Prevent dominant personalities swaying the group, drowning out the opinions of others – GroupMap allows everyone to brainstorm independently then effortlessly combines that information to reveal the full spectrum of ideas. GroupMap templates keep the objective front and center throughout the session, keeping everyone on task. This ensures the activity identifies actionable issues rather than becoming just a discussion on ideas. GroupMap gives you all the group decision making tools you need to prioritize, decide and take action.

Create your first map and invite people in to start sharing their thoughts right NOW. Experience the power of GroupMap with our 14-day, no risk, FREE trial. You don’t even need to provide your credit card details to access to all of our features, including the entire suite of templates, for a full 14 days.

Value Proposition Canvas

Value Proposition Canvas

What is the Value Proposition Canvas?

The Value Proposition Canvas is a tool developed by Dr Alexander Osterwalder to ensure there is a fit between a product and market by exploring the relationship between a Customer’s needs and the value proposition of the organization. 

This can be a new or an existing product or service, but aims to align what an organization delivers to reduce the pains and increase the gains for their target customer.

The Value Proposition Canvas has two building blocks – customer profile and an organisation’s value proposition. 

In the Customer Profile block, we look at the following elements: 

  • Gains – the benefits which the customer expects and needs and the things which may increase likelihood of adopting a value proposition.
  • Pains – the negative experiences, emotions and risks that the customer experiences in the process of getting the job done.
  • Customer jobs – the functional, social and emotional tasks customers are trying to perform, problems they are trying to solve, and needs they wish to satisfy.

A customer profile is created for each customer segment, as each segment has distinct gains, pains and jobs.

In the Value Map block, we look at the value proposition that an organization offers through its products and/or services, including: 

  • Gain creators – how the product or service creates customer gains and how it offers added value to the customer.
  • Pain relievers – a description of exactly how the product or service alleviates customer pains.
  • Products and services – the products and services which create gain and relieve pain, and which underpin the creation of value for the customer.

Why Do a Value Proposition Analysis?

The Value Proposition Canvas can help any business or organization to:

  • Define their customer profiles. By brainstorming and analyzing the Customer Profile block, companies can identify their customers’ major jobs-to-be-done, the pains they face when trying to accomplish their jobs-to-be-done, and the gains they perceive by getting their jobs done.
  • Visualize the value of the organizations’ product or service create. Define the most important components of your offering, how you relieve pain and create gains for your identified and targeted customers.
  • Achieve Product-Market fit. Adjust your Value Proposition based on the insights you gained from customer evidence and achieve Product-Market fit.
Related templates

References

 
Tips to start your Value Proposition Canvas

Who Should Use a Value Proposition Canvas?

The Value Proposition Canvas is a great tool for marketing experts, product owners, and value creators and their teams, who work to develop products and services to a targeted audience. It is also valuable for any teams and organizations who are trying to understand how customers make decisions and what offers to create that they will find appealing.

When Should I Complete a Value Proposition Canvas?

  • Understanding who your customers are, including what their lifestyles and real needs are to help create relevant products and services.
  • Develop value propositions for your products and services for effective communications and marketing to your identified customers.
  • Increasing the sales and profitability of your products and services.
  • Reducing time wasted on developing ideas that customers may not be interested in.
  • Improving or innovating new products or services.

The Right Way to use the Value Proposition Canvas

The value proposition template is essentially made up of 2 blocks with one being what the customer segment is and how we might best service their needs. You start by completing the various aspects of the canvas and then look for gaps and alignment to validate that what you are able or can deliver meets the needs of the customer.

While the canvas itself depicts the customer profile on the right and the natural inclination is for you to start with the goods and services of the business first, it is actually more important to firstly identify what your customer needs and expectations are. This way you are focussing on the needs of your customers and ensuring that the elements that you can control (what your product or services actually deliver) can be refined to ensure that there is alignment.

The next step is to then identify gaps and check that there is alignment between the 2 areas. This allows you to then create experiments, ask more questions or create action items that will help you move towards delighting the customer and growing your business. A really easy way is to have the team vote for the areas that need the most discussion.

Customer Profile

This section looks at what jobs or goals the specific customer has and what are their positive and negative states that they experience.

Start here.

Focus on just one segment at a time so that you do not confuse or have mixed messages in your planning process when completing the lean canvas.

Segments could be by age, social status, interest or psychographic.

By only having a single focus on the segment, it makes it easier to identify the highest priority jobs, pains and gains related to that segment. This helps you understand customer preferences, biases and thoughts.

The size of the segment can be refined if you are finding that it is too broad or too large and it starts to feel generic. For example, all people between 8 and 18 who use sunscreen is more specific than the Youth Market for sunscreen. 

Value Proposition

This section is about what products and services are targeted at the segment and the key benefits provided when the customer buys from us.

 

Align here.

This is where you might list the actual or proposed services or goods that you might use to service the customer segment.

The goal here is not to simply list everything that you may do, but to highlight the key ones that are servicing that customer’s need.

For example, Sunscreen targeted at the ages 8 to 18 may be an aesthetic brand which has a shorter application time frame but higher SPF rating that matches their behaviour but might not include higher priced brands that have skin moisturising and anti-wrinkle qualities.

A well-suited message then connects the consumers mind to your brand or product if the value proposition is clear and meets their specific needs. 

How to Complete a Value Proposition Canvas

Start a Value Proposition for a product or service by filling out the template and then where there are gaps. You can use the gaps as validation to run more experiments, ask more questions, try out new ideas. By understanding your customers’ preferences, biases and thoughts, you’ll find new ways to delight them and grow your business.

Brainstorm

Brainstorm ideas for each area of the Value Proposition canvas.

Group

Review responses, and collate ideas.

Vote

Rate the ideas according to likely impact on the organization.

Share

Share the outcomes of the session to relevant stakeholders.

Cross Device Compatibility

Save effort, time and money with GroupMap

Whether you have your best minds together in the same room, or distributed around the world, GroupMap’s unique technology allows groups of up to 2000 to submit ideas independently at separate times, from different places, in different timezones. Prevent dominant personalities swaying the group, drowning out the opinions of others – GroupMap allows everyone to brainstorm independently then effortlessly combines that information to reveal the full spectrum of ideas. GroupMap templates keep the objective front and center throughout the session, keeping everyone on task. This ensures the activity identifies actionable issues rather than becoming just a discussion on ideas. GroupMap gives you all the group decision making tools you need to prioritize, decide and take action.

Create your first map and invite people in to start sharing their thoughts right NOW. Experience the power of GroupMap with our 14-day, no risk, FREE trial. You don’t even need to provide your credit card details to access to all of our features, including the entire suite of templates, for a full 14 days.

Force Field Analysis

Force Field Analysis

What is a Force Field Analysis?

Force Field Analysis is a tool that helps a change practitioner to visually map and analyze the driving and resisting forces behind a project, a decision or initiative. A Force Field Analysis does this identifying two forces that are arranged as opposing forces or as a “force field.” These two forces are driving forces (those that are working in the direction of the change) and resisting and/or restraining forces (those that tend to support the status quo).

Force Field Analysis is a powerful decision-making tool that was originally developed by Kurt Lewin in 1951. Today, the Force Field Analysis model is still used by many organizations for supporting change processes. 

The idea behind Force Field Analysis is that situations are maintained by an equilibrium between forces that drive change and others that resist change. So, for change to happen, the driving forces must be strengthened or the resisting forces weakened.

A Force Field Analysis template in GroupMap helps you to visually map and brainstorm, in real time, the driving and resisting forces around decisions to be made. 

Why do a Force Field Analysis?

When you are making difficult or challenging decisions, using an effective and structured decision-making technique such as the Force Field Analysis can help to improve the quality of your decisions and increase your chances of success.

Conducting a Force Field Analysis will help you to see the bigger picture, to identify and overcome obstacles and to develop a plan which will significantly increase the likelihood of a successful outcome.

Related templates
Facilitation tips
References
  • Lewin, Kurt. 1946. “Force Field Analysis.” The 1973 Annual Handbook for Group Facilitators. 111-13.
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Force-field_analysis

Who Can Use a Force Field Analysis?

Anyone involved in the change implementation process or need to diagnose problems can use the Force Field Analysis. This includes but is not limited to:

  • Human Resources
  • C level suites / executives
  • Teams, departments, sections that are focused on change management
  • Change management consultants 

Use the Force Field Analysis model to help with:

  • Analyzing the balance of power
  • Identifying the key roles involved in decision-making 
  • Identifying who supports and opposes change within the organization
  • Exploring ways to influence those who are against change  
  • Deciding whether to go ahead with a proposed change or not

Force Field Analysis Template

A Force Field Analysis Template  provides a visual representation of the driving forces and restraining forces for and against an initiative, a project or change proposal. 

Common dimensions used for a Force Field Analysis map include:

Driving Forces

What are the creators of change or factors that are driving change to happen or be considered

Examples can include:

Competitive advantage, need for increased productivity, overwhelming customer request, new technologies, internal team requests, new trade or commercial restrictions and requirements, to achieve funding grants & initiatives, etc.

Questions to ask:

  • Why do we need to make these changes?
  • Who is requesting for this change and why?

Restraining Forces

What are the obstacles for change or opposition that is expected to prevent change from happening.

Examples include:

Associated costs for change, opposition from some team members, potential unhappy customers and lost loyalty and revenue, available resources to manage change, time available to make the change/s on time, etc.

Questions to ask:

  • What factors will affect us moving forward?
  • Who will oppose us moving forward or making changes?

The resulting brainstorm allows for scoring to understand how important the forces are and how to address them in a further action plan or SWOT analysis.

How to Do a Force Field Analysis

Assemble a small group – between 5 – 9 people – who are directly involved in the change implementation process. 

There are six general steps to completing a Force Field Analysis and the time taken will depend on the organization, the complexity of the forces, the number of people involved, amongst other things.

Tip At the end of the analysis, it is expected that an action plan will be available or is on the list to be developed to progress change for a project or initiative in a successful manner.

Scope

Assess the current situation of the organization in terms of the issue at hand.

Define

Identify what objectives the team would like to gain from conducting this analysis.

Brainstorm

Together with your group, discuss and list all of the driving and restraining forces.

Score

Evaluate the influence of each force by assigning them scores on a matrix that determines their importance.

Report

Report on the outcomes and share the results of the analysis with the rest of the team or company for good communications.

Cross Device Compatibility

Save effort, time and money with GroupMap

Whether you have your best minds together in the same room, or distributed around the world, GroupMap’s unique technology allows groups of up to 2000 to submit ideas independently at separate times, from different places, in different timezones. Prevent dominant personalities swaying the group, drowning out the opinions of others – GroupMap allows everyone to brainstorm independently then effortlessly combines that information to reveal the full spectrum of ideas. GroupMap templates keep the objective front and center throughout the session, keeping everyone on task. This ensures the activity identifies actionable issues rather than becoming just a discussion on ideas. GroupMap gives you all the group decision making tools you need to prioritize, decide and take action.

Create your first map and invite people in to start sharing their thoughts right NOW. Experience the power of GroupMap with our 14-day, no risk, FREE trial. You don’t even need to provide your credit card details to access to all of our features, including the entire suite of templates, for a full 14 days.

PEST Analysis

What is a PEST Analysis?

A PEST analysis is a strategic business tool used by organizations to discover, evaluate, organize, and track macro-economic factors which can impact on their business now and in the future. 

The framework examines opportunities and threats due to Political, Economic, Social, and Technological forces. Outputs from the analysis inform strategic planning processes and contribute to market research.

The output from a PEST analysis is useful for informing other business management processes such as SWOT analysisSOAR analysisrisk analysis, or a Business Model Canvas.

There are many variations of this framework, which look at different external factors, depending on which industry or market the organization operates in. Examples include PESTLE, STEEPLE, STEER, and STEEP.

Why do a PEST Analysis?

  • Helps to evaluate how your strategy fits into the broader environment and encourages strategic thinking
  • Provides an overview of all the crucial external influences on the organization
  • Supports more decisive and knowledgeable decision making
  • Assists planning, marketing, organizational change initiatives, business and product development, project management, and research papers

Who should use a PEST Analysis?

A PEST analysis is useful for any organization that needs to gauge current and future markets. Predominantly, this is conducted by senior management, C-levels for strategic planning purposes. External agencies, bodies, stakeholders and decision makers who may have perspectives as well as consultants and parters can also offer valuable insights into the PEST analysis.

The significance of each area in PEST Analysis will vary for different industry sectors. For example, there is likely to be a different emphasis on the technology element for IT organizations compared with those involved in health, tourism, mining, defense, and banking.

Facilitation tips in conducing a PEST Analysis
References

PEST Analysis Template

Political

Political or politically motivated factors that could impact the organization.

Examples include:

Government policy, political stability or instability, bureaucracy, corruption, competition regulation, foreign trade policy, tax policy, trade restrictions, labor/environmental/copyright/consumer protection laws, funding grants & initiatives, etc.

Questions to ask:

  • What government policies or political groups could be beneficial or detrimental to our success?
  • Is the political environment stable or likely to change?

Social

Social attitudes, behaviors, and trends that impact on your organization and target market.

Examples include:

Attitudes and shared beliefs about a range of factors including money, customer service, imports, religion, cultural taboos, health, work, leisure, the environment; population growth and demographics, immigration/emigration, family size/structure, lifestyle trends, etc.

Questions to ask

  • How do our customer’s beliefs and values influence their buying habits?
  • How do cultural trends and human behavior play a role in our business?

Economic

Overall economic forces that could impact on your success.

Examples include:

Economic trends, growth rates, industry growth, seasonal factors, international exchange rates, International trade, labor costs, consumer disposable income, unemployment rates, taxation, inflation, interest rates, availability of credit, monetary policies, raw material costs, etc.

Questions to ask:

  • What economic factors will affect us moving forward?
  • How does the performance of the economy affect us at the moment?
  • How are our pricing, revenues, and costs impacted by each economic factor?

Technological

Technology that can affect the way you make, distribute, and market your products and services.

Examples include:

Technology and communications infrastructure, legislation around technology, consumer access to technology, competitor technology and development, emerging technologies, automation, research and innovation, intellectual property regulation, technology incentives, etc.

Questions to ask:

  • What technological advancements and innovations are available on the horizon?
  • How will this technology impact on our operations?

How to Do a PEST Analysis

Analyze and consider both the current status of factors in the PEST template and how potential changes might affect the organization in the future.

Tip To get the most from the PEST technique, gather input from the participants with different perspectives. When you’re working with a large or distributed team, getting everyone together at the same time can be difficult, inconvenient, and costly. Using different technologies like video conferencing, online forms, and collaborative brainstorming software such as GroupMap can help overcome these challenges.

Brainstorm

Brainstorm ideas for each area of the PEST analysis template

Group

Review responses, and collate ideas.

Rate

Rate the ideas according to likely impact on the organization.

Share

Share the outcomes of the session to relevant stakeholders.

Cross Device Compatibility

Save effort, time and money with GroupMap

Whether you have your best minds together in the same room, or distributed around the world, GroupMap’s unique technology allows groups of up to 2000 to submit ideas independently at separate times, from different places, in different timezones. Prevent dominant personalities swaying the group, drowning out the opinions of others – GroupMap allows everyone to brainstorm independently then effortlessly combines that information to reveal the full spectrum of ideas. GroupMap templates keep the objective front and center throughout the session, keeping everyone on task. This ensures the activity identifies actionable issues rather than becoming just a discussion on ideas. GroupMap gives you all the group decision making tools you need to prioritize, decide and take action.

Create your first map and invite people in to start sharing their thoughts right NOW. Experience the power of GroupMap with our 14-day, no risk, FREE trial. You don’t even need to provide your credit card details to access to all of our features, including the entire suite of templates, for a full 14 days.

Start Stop Retrospective

Start Stop Retrospective

What is a Start Stop Retrospective?

A start stop retrospective is a simple and effective way for teams to reflect on their recent experiences and decide on what things they should change as they move forward.
  • Start – activities are those things the team will begin doing in the next cycle.
  • Stop – looks back at the previous cycle of the project to identify which things didn’t work and should cease.

Why Do a Start Stop Retrospective?

The start stop retrospective is one of the simplest project review techniques and requires no special equipment or knowledge to complete.

This technique starts by identifying actions that team members think they should “do” rather than “ideas and issues” that require solutions and then the development of an action plan as with Agile and 4Ls Retrospectives.

This retrospective technique:

  • Gives teams an opportunity to review how they are going and identify improvements they can implement in the future.
  • Makes it easier for teams to clarify issues, weight the impact of ideas, and reach a consensus based on shared priorities.
  • Is very action orientated and provides momentum and energy for the team. Each item on the list results in behavioral change.
  • Empowers teams to continuously improve the way they work.
Tips

Who Should Do a Start Stop Retrospective?

Because of it’s simplicity this retrospective method is suitable for:

  • All kinds of project teams including software development
  • Program reviews
  • Executive reviews
  • Personal performance evaluations
  • 4Ls retrospective
  • Agile retrospective
  • Starfish retrospective
  • Anchors and engines
  • DAKI retrospective

Start Stop Retrospective Template

Start

Activities that may:

  • improve processes
  • reduce waste
  • have a positive impact on the way the team operates

As with “stop” activities, consider both technical and behavioral aspects.

Stop

Activities that:

  • are inefficient
  • waste time or resources
  • have a negative impact on the way people feel or the way things work

Activities on this list may be technical or behavioral things and should cease.

How to Run a Start Stop Retrospective

A start stop retrospective is one of the simplest review tools. It require no specialized equipment or skills, other than the ability to facilitate group discussions.

If the review team is scattered over different locations, there are challenges ensuring everyone is involved, and facilitators may need to look beyond the usual sticky notes and whiteboards to video conferencing, web-based applications such as Google docs, and specialized online collaboration tools such as GroupMap.

Most start stop retrospectives will take less than 20 minutes. You can time-box stages of the process to keep the team on track.

Brainstorm

Discuss and populate the two columns of the start stop retrospective template.

Group

Discuss and group any common themes.

Vote

Vote on the key areas you need to take action on.

Share

Share and communicate the outcomes of the session to relevant stakeholders.

Cross Device Compatibility

Save effort, time and money with GroupMap

Whether you have your best minds together in the same room, or distributed around the world, GroupMap’s unique technology allows groups of up to 2000 to submit ideas independently at separate times, from different places, in different timezones. Prevent dominant personalities swaying the group, drowning out the opinions of others – GroupMap allows everyone to brainstorm independently then effortlessly combines that information to reveal the full spectrum of ideas. GroupMap templates keep the objective front and center throughout the session, keeping everyone on task. This ensures the activity identifies actionable issues rather than becoming just a discussion on ideas. GroupMap gives you all the group decision making tools you need to prioritize, decide and take action.

Create your first map and invite people in to start sharing their thoughts right NOW. Experience the power of GroupMap with our 14-day, no risk, FREE trial. You don’t even need to provide your credit card details to access to all of our features, including the entire suite of templates, for a full 14 days.

Start Stop Continue Retrospective

Start Stop Continue Retrospective

What is a Start Stop Continue Retrospective?

A start stop continue retrospective is a simple and effective way for teams to reflect on their recent experiences and decide on what things they should change as they move forward.
  • Start – activities are those things the team will begin doing in the next cycle.
  • Stop – looks back at the previous cycle of the project to identify which things didn’t work and should cease.
  • Continue – identifies things that worked in the previous cycle and need to be part of the team’s core activities.

Why Do a Start Stop Continue Retrospective?

The start stop continue retrospective is one of the simplest project review techniques and requires no special equipment or knowledge to complete.

This technique starts by identifying actions that team members think they should “do.” The method differs from Agile and 4Ls Retrospectives which develop ideas and issues requiring solutions first and THEN develop an action plan.

This retrospective technique:

  • Gives teams an opportunity to review how they are going and identify improvements they can implement in the future.
  • Makes it easier for teams to clarify issues, weight the impact of ideas, and reach a consensus based on shared priorities.
  • Is very action orientated and provides momentum and energy for the team. Each item on the list results in behavioral change.
  • Empowers teams to continuously improve the way they work.

Who Should Do a Start Stop Continue Retrospective?

Because of it’s simplicity this retrospective method is suitable for:

  • All kinds of project teams including software development
  • Program reviews
  • Executive reviews
  • Personal performance evaluations
Related templates
Facilitation tips

Start Stop Continue Retrospective Template

Start

Activities that may:

  • improve processes
  • reduce waste
  • have a positive impact on the way the team operates

As with “stop” activities, consider both technical and behavioral aspects. If they work they can go onto the continue list in the next review.

Stop

Activities that:

  • are inefficient
  • waste time or resources
  • have a negative impact on the way people feel or the way things work

Activities on this list may be technical or behavioral things and should cease.

Continue

Activities the team has tried and were successful but are not yet part of common practice.

Once the activities are part of the way things are done, add them to procedure manuals and checklists and remove from this list.

How to Run a Start Stop Continue Retrospective

A start stop continue retrospective is one of the simplest review tools. It require no specialized equipment or skills, other than the ability to facilitate group discussions.

If the review team is scattered over different locations, there are challenges ensuring everyone is involved. Facilitators may need to look beyond the usual sticky notes and whiteboards to video conferencing, web-based applications such as Google Docs, and specialized online collaboration tools such as GroupMap.

Most start stop continue retrospectives will take less than 20 minutes. You can time-box stages of the process to keep the team on track.

Brainstorm

Discuss and populate the three columns of the start stop continue retrospective template.

Group

Discuss and group any common themes.

Vote

Vote on the key areas you need to take action on.

Share

Share and communicate the outcomes of the session to relevant stakeholders.

Cross Device Compatibility

Save effort, time and money with GroupMap

Whether you have your best minds together in the same room, or distributed around the world, GroupMap’s unique technology allows groups of up to 2000 to submit ideas independently at separate times, from different places, in different timezones. Prevent dominant personalities swaying the group, drowning out the opinions of others – GroupMap allows everyone to brainstorm independently then effortlessly combines that information to reveal the full spectrum of ideas. GroupMap templates keep the objective front and center throughout the session, keeping everyone on task. This ensures the activity identifies actionable issues rather than becoming just a discussion on ideas. GroupMap gives you all the group decision making tools you need to prioritize, decide and take action.

Create your first map and invite people in to start sharing their thoughts right NOW. Experience the power of GroupMap with our 14-day, no risk, FREE trial. You don’t even need to provide your credit card details to access to all of our features, including the entire suite of templates, for a full 14 days.

RAID Log template

risk-assumption-issus-and-dependencies-log

RAID logging is a simple, but useful, project management technique for assessing factors affecting successful project outcomes. The RAID methodology identifies risks (R), assumptions (A), issues (I), and dependencies (D) that a project may have – allowing each to be proactively managed.

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